All posts by edcu

Designed for discovery (Part II : Features of discovery)

Continued from “Designed for discovery : Part I”   or click here to listen to the full audio version


[Feature 1]Discovery HKK Philip Williams tag.013.jpeg

Now, let’s return to consider the common features of what “discovery” means. Discovery is a transformativeexperience where we have crossed a threshold into an understanding that fundamentally changes us and influences our future actions. After a moment of discovery, we cannot view the world in same way we have in the past. This is where discovery closely parallels the idea of threshold concepts in information literacy where these threshold concepts aredefined as transformative, integrative, irreversible, bounded and troublesome (Visit the Threshold Concepts and Information Literacy website for many freely available resources). An example in my personal experience is my discovery of the world of audiobooks that fundamentally changed my perspective and provided access to books that I would not have read or been able to read previously. Moby Dick read by Anthony Heald, was one of my first audiobooks. When ever I had picked up a copy of Moby Dick, I felt it to be too cumbersome, too much of an epic investment to attempt, however, to have it read to me by a professional voice actor opened up whole new experience of literature and story that was previously obscure to me. This discovery was transformative and fundamentally added to my literary experience. Continue reading Designed for discovery (Part II : Features of discovery)

“The world is becoming more complex” – is it really? Pause and consider this.

(10 minute read) Many presentations and articles in education and technology forums begin by saying that the world is becoming more complex than it ever has been before. Let’s pause to consider if this is actually true. By what measure is this assertion being made? What assumptions may underpin such statements? Is the world actually becoming more complex or are we just becoming more aware of the complexity that has always been present? What do we stand to lose if we assume the world is becoming more complex?

There is no doubt that global communication systems are becoming more interconnected and the number of people plugging into these complex networks is increasing so from this perspective, the world is indeed becoming more complex. However, the complexity of the world around us can be measured in many different ways. Continue reading “The world is becoming more complex” – is it really? Pause and consider this.

A BigBookSnap : “A Blueprint for Tomorrow” by Prakash Nair

“Six Educational Strategies That The Design Principles Should Support”

From “A Blueprint for Tomorrow : Redesigning Schools for Student-Centred Learning” by Prakash Nair

Inspired by our secondary students who have been using Booksnaps over recent weeks, I decided to make my own. The problem is that my #Booksnap grew to become a #BigBookSnap. I am definitely biased here but it often seems that the school library is an obvious place to support student centred learning through collaboration, supportive environments, technology, flexibility and opportunities for connection, since these have long been the core functions of the school library. This BigBookSnap picks up on some of Nair’s strategies and connects them directly with the library. This is not really in the spirit of the concise booksnap but here it is anyway.

Embracing Complex Systems in Education [video 02:47]

Here is a brief introductory video to complex systems in education and here is what I have been reading about this topic recently:

For the mystical and esoteric read “Small Arcs of Larger Circles: Framing through other patterns” by Nora Bateson

To escape the mechanical and linear view of the world read Embracing Complexity Strategic Perspectives for an Age of Turbulence by Jean G. BoultonPeter M. AllenCliff Bowman

On reinventing education from the ground up read On Reinventing Education in the Age of Complexity: A Vygotsky-­inspired Generative Complexity Approach by Ton Jorg

On applying systems thinking – the “Fifth Discipline” – to escape from an industrial model of education read Schools That Learn: A Fifth Discipline Fieldbook for Educators, Parents and Everyone Who Cares About Education by Peter M. SengeNelda Cambron-MccabeTimothy LucasBryan SmithJanis Dutton

 

What is research anyway?

It is frequently the experience of librarians that a request is made to engage with a class in the process of research, either for a specific inquiry or to learn about a new database, to explore a new searching skill or simply to gain some research tips and tricks. This is the perfect time to stop to consider what this idea of “research” is. Why would we bother teaching it when access to information seems to be easier now than it ever was? Is it a passing skill and are other priorities taking it’s place? Continue reading What is research anyway?